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IPC Users Guide/Use Cases for IPC

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Table of Contents IPC User's Guide Previous; About IPC The ti.sdo.ipc Package Next


You can use IPC modules in a variety of combinations. From the simplest setup to the setup with the most functionality, the use case options are as follows. A number of variations of these cases are also possible:

  • Minimal use of IPC. (BIOS-to-BIOS only) This scenario performs inter-processor notification. The amount of data passed with a notification is minimal--typically on the order of 32 bits. This scenario is best used for simple synchronization between processors without the overhead and complexity of message-passing infrastructure.
  • Add data passing. (BIOS-to-BIOS only) This scenario adds the ability to pass linked list elements between processors to the previous minimal scenario. The linked list implementation may optionally use shared memory and/or gates to manage synchronization.
  • Add dynamic allocation. (BIOS-to-BIOS only) This scenario adds the ability to dynamically allocate linked list elements from a heap.
  • Powerful but easy-to-use messaging. (HLOS and BIOS) This scenario uses the MessageQ module for messaging. The application configures other modules. However, the APIs for other modules are then used internally by MessageQ, rather than directly by the application.

In the following sections, figures show modules used by each scenario.

  • Blue boxes identify modules for which your application will call C API functions other than those used to dynamically create objects.
  • Red boxes identify modules that require only configuration by your application. Static configuration is performed in an XDCtools configuration script (.cfg). Dynamic configuration is performed in C code.
  • Grey boxes identify modules that are used internally but do not need to be configured or have their APIs called.

Minimal Use Scenario (BIOS-to-BIOS only)

This scenario performs inter-processor notification using a Notify driver, which is used by the Notify module. This scenario is best used for simple synchronization in which you want to send a message to another processor to tell it to perform some action and optionally have it notify the first processor when it is finished.

IpcUG_over_1_2_1.png

In this scenario, you make API calls to the Notify module. For example, the Notify_sendEvent() function sends an event to the specified processor. You can dynamically register callback functions with the Notify module to handle such events.

You must statically configure MultiProc module properties, which are used by the Notify module.

The amount of data passed with a notification is minimal. You can send an event number, which is typically used by the callback function to determine what action it needs to perform. Optionally, a small "payload" of data can also be sent.

See Notify Module and MultiProc Module.

NOTE

If you are using a Concerto F28M35x device, this scenario is supported. See Using IPC on Concerto Devices for details.

Data Passing Scenario (BIOS-to-BIOS only)

In addition to the IPC modules used in the previous scenario, you can use the ListMP module to share a linked list between processors.

IpcUG_over_1_2_2.png

In this scenario, you make API calls to the Notify and ListMP modules.

The ListMP module is a doubly-linked-list designed to be shared by multiple processors. ListMP differs from a conventional "local" linked list in the following ways:

  • Address translation is performed internally upon pointers contained within the data structure.
  • Cache coherency is maintained when the cacheable shared memory is used.
  • A multi-processor gate (GateMP) is used to protect read/write accesses to the list by two or more processors.

ListMP uses SharedRegion's lookup table to manage access to shared memory, so configuration of the SharedRegion module is required.

Internally, ListMP can optionally use the NameServer module to manage name/value pairs. The ListMP module also uses a GateMP object, which your application must configure. The GateMP is used internally to synchronize access to the list elements.

See ListMP Module, GateMP Module, SharedRegion Module, and NameServer Module.

NOTE

If you are using a Concerto F28M35x device, this scenario is not supported due to shared memory limitations. See Using IPC on Concerto Devices for details.

Dynamic Allocation Scenario (BIOS-to-BIOS only)

To the previous scenario, you can add dynamic allocation of ListMP elements using one of the Heap*MP modules.

IpcUG_over_1_2_3.png

In this scenario, you make API calls to the Notify and ListMP modules and a Heap*MP module.

In addition to the modules that you configured for the previous scenario, the Heap*MP modules use a GateMP that you must configure. You may use the same GateMP instance used by ListMP.

See Heap*MP Modules and GateMP Module.

NOTE

If you are using a Concerto F28M35x device, this scenario is not supported due to shared memory limitations. See Using IPC on Concerto Devices for details.

Powerful But Easy-to-Use Messaging with MessageQ (HLOS and BIOS)

Finally, to use the most sophisticated inter-processor communication scenario supported by IPC, you can add the MessageQ module. Note that the following diagram shows one particular transport (TransportShm) and may not apply to all devices and/or environments.

IpcUG_over_1_2_4.png

In this scenario, you make API calls to the MessageQ module for inter-processor communication.

API calls made to the Notify, ListMP, and Heap*MP modules in the previous scenarios are not needed. Instead, your application only needs to configure the MultiProc and (if the underlying MessageQ transport requires it) the SharedRegion modules.

NOTE

Some MessageQ transports do not use SharedRegion, but instead copy the message payloads. This may be done because of hardware limitations (e.g. no shared memory is available) or software design (e.g. transports built on Linux kernel-friendly rpmsg drivers).

The Ipc_start() API call configures all the necessary underlying modules (e.g. Notify, HeapMemMP, ListMP, TransportShm, NameServer, and GateMP). The actual details of what modules Ipc_start() initializes varies from environment to environment.

It is possible to use MessageQ in a single-processor SYS/BIOS application. In such a case, only API calls to MessageQ and configuration of any xdc.runtime.IHeap implementation are needed.

NOTE

If you are using a Concerto F28M35x device, this scenario is supported, but fewer modules are used due to shared memory limitations. See Using IPC on Concerto Devices for details.



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